DNA test awaited 3 dead BD plane crash victims in Nepal

DNA test awaited 3 dead BD plane crash victims in Nepal

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Dhaka, March 20 – The relatives of three passengers who died in Nepal plane crash will have to wait for some more time to get their bodies as it would require the matching of DNA samples. The DNA samples of the three Bangladeshi deceased passengers who were on board of the US-Bangla Airlines plane that crashed on 12 March will reach Dhaka on Wednesday, said Dr Sohel Mahmud, forensic expert of Dhaka Medical College Hospital (DMCH) yesterday.
The bodies of thee three passengers are Mohammad Nazrul Islam from Chapainawabganj, Pias Roy from Barial and Mollah Alifuzzaman from Khulan who now at the morgue of a Tribhuvan University Teaching Hospital.
“Sub-inspector of Criminal Investigation Department and DNA Analyst will bring the DNA samples in Dhaka on Wednesday,” Sohel Mahmud told the journalists.
He said the identification of the three bodies will be confirmed after matching it with their relatives which might take a week to identify the bodies.
Soon after the plane crash, a high-powered medical team reached Kathmandu to identify the bodies because most of the bodies were charred. Forensic expert Sohel Mahmud was among the team and he returned home on Monday after completing all necessary task for the identification of the bodies.
He said they have confirmed the body of Nazrul Islam from their preliminary examination but it also needs DNA test.
“When the DNA will arrive here, the DNA of the relatives will also be collected for matching. It will need some time around one week,” he added.
Meanwhile, the Forensic Department of the Tribhuvan University Teaching Hospital on Monday said all the Nepali victims had been identified while the bodies of three Bangladeshis might need DNA testing for identification, reports Kathmandu Post yesterday.
“We have demanded additional information from the Embassy of Bangladesh in Kathmandu about the passengers who are yet to be identified,” said Dr Pramod Shrestha, chief of the TUTH forensic department.
It takes a month to conduct DNA tests to identify the bodies, he added.
Doctors use a variety of identification techniques before the bodies are handed over to their families.
Accessories like earrings, jewellery or details like shape of jaws help doctors ascertain the identity. They also try to secure fingerprints of the deceased and match them with prints on their citizenship or other national identity cards. DNA test is the last resort when these techniques fail, the report said.
Meanwhile, 23 bodies out of 26 had already been handed over to the relatives at the Army Stadium in the capital on Monday. – Staff Reporter

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