Know about thyroid disorder

Know about thyroid disorder

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May 25th is World Thyroid Day. “World Thyroid Day” is a call for action to spread words about thyroid disorders, to increase awareness about the disease and to educate people on what they can do to prevent them or minimize their impact.Thyroid gland, a butterfly-shaped gland in the front of the neck, produces hormones that influence every cell, tissue, and organ in the body. Thyroid hormones regulate body’s metabolism, affect the growth and rate of function of many other systems in the body, they also regulate the heart rate.
Thyroid gland disorders are among the most common endocrine conditions evaluated and treated by clinicians. Thyroid dysfunction represents a continuum from asymptomatic biochemical changes to clinically symptomatic disease, rarely produces life-threatening complications, like myxedema coma or thyroid storm. The most stunning statistics are that up to 60 percent of those with thyroid disease are unaware of their condition. Women are five to eight times more likely than men to have thyroid problems.
Underproduction of the thyroid hormones causes Hypothyroidism. It affects women 10 times more than men worldwide. It may results from autoimmune disorder like hasimoto’s thyroiditis, surgical removal or chemical destruction of thyroid gland, exposure to excessive amounts of iodide (such as drug, contrast media). Symptoms of hypothyroidism includes unusual weakness, feeling cold, fluid retention, weight gain, dry skin, constipation, poor concentration or feeling mentally “foggy”, depression, muscle and joint pain, prolonged or excessive menstrual bleeding in women.
Hypothyroidism poses a special danger to newborns and infants. A lack of thyroid hormones at an early age can lead to mental retardation and stunted growth.  A hypothyroid infant is unusually inactive and quiet, has a poor appetite, and sleeps for excessively long periods of time. Most infants now have their thyroid levels checked routinely soon after birth. If they are hypothyroid, treatment begins immediately.
Excessive production of thyroid hormone causes Hyperthyroidism. It is less common condition than hypothyroidism. It may be due to Graves’ disease, toxic multinodular goiter, thyroid nodules, excessive iodine consumption. Symptoms of hypothyroidism usually relate to increased metabolism.  It includes palpitation, tremor, nervousness, intolerance for heat, increase in bowel movements, increased sweating, and weight loss.
The serum TSH test is the primary screening test for thyroid dysfunction. If you believe you are experiencing symptoms which could be related to thyroid disease, please speak to an endocrinologist or hormone specialist and ask to be tested. Awareness, diagnosis and treatment will overcome this important health issue and its consequences, reports internet.

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