US keeps B’desh outside GSP, It’s political, Tofail

US keeps B’desh outside GSP, It’s political, Tofail

0

As indicated earlier in January this year’s review, Bangladesh has been excluded in the renewal of Generalized System of Preferences (GSP).

On June 29, 2015, President Barack Obama signed into law a bill (H.R. 1295), that reauthorises the GSP through Dec 31, 2017, according to Office of the United States Trade Representative (USTR).This excludes goods that entered from Russia, which formally graduated from the GSP programme on Oct. 4, 2014, and any other countries that are no longer eligible for GSP benefits, such as Bangladesh.

Talking to reporters, Commerce Minister Tofail Ahmed described the non-restoration of GSP benefit as ‘unfortunate’, and mentioned that it is only politics, not other reasons, behind depriving Bangladesh.

He said Bangladesh fulfilled most of the conditions tagged by the US to get back GSP but the US decision forced him showing no interest in taking further initiatives. “But, I hope, the US will consider it at the upcoming Ticfa meeting.”

The Commerce Minister alleged that many countries do not want the growth of Bangladesh. “Even Pakistan, where the human rights are violated and working condition is bad has been given the GSP.”

Bangladesh’s apparels have been enjoying duty-free benefits to majority of the developed and developing countries. But Bangladesh’s apparels do not enjoy duty-free benefit only in US market.

The Commerce Minister hoped that nobody can stop the march forward of Bangladesh as the export from Bangladesh to the US and also to the EU will not be hampered due to latest move by the USTR.

In January this year’s review, the USTR recognised progress but urged that more needs to be done on worker safety and rights.

The USTR-led interagency review concluded that while Bangladesh has made progress over the last year to address fire and building safety issues in the ready-made garment (RMG) sector, further progress is needed, including to address serious worker rights issues, before the reinstatement of Bangladesh’s trade benefits under the GSP can be considered.

President Obama suspended Bangladesh from GSP in June 2013 based on Bangladesh’s failure to meet statutory eligibility requirements related to worker rights.

GSP is a trade scheme under which the US allows import of more than 5,000 goods from 122 least developed and developing countries with lower or zero-duty benefit.

Under the new law, duty reductions under the GSP program will begin 30 days after the law is enacted, which took effect on July 29, 2015.

It also extends duty reductions retroactively for any goods entered in between July 31, 2013, and the effective date.

Accordingly, filers shall be entitled to file GSP-eligible entry summaries, utilising the Special Program Indicator (SPI) “A,” “A+,” or “A*,” without the payment of duty for shipments entered or withdrawn from warehouse for consumption effective July 29, 2015.

Bangladesh experienced two industrial disasters — Tazreen Fashions fire and Rana Plaza building collapse that forced the US suspended GSP. … BBC Newsangladesh has been excluded in the renewal of Generalized System of Preferences (GSP).

On June 29, 2015, President Barack Obama signed into law a bill (H.R. 1295), that reauthorises the GSP through Dec 31, 2017, according to Office of the United States Trade Representative (USTR).

This excludes goods that entered from Russia, which formally graduated from the GSP programme on Oct. 4, 2014, and any other countries that are no longer eligible for GSP benefits, such as Bangladesh.

Talking to reporters, Commerce Minister Tofail Ahmed described the non-restoration of GSP benefit as ‘unfortunate’, and mentioned that it is only politics, not other reasons, behind depriving Bangladesh.

He said Bangladesh fulfilled most of the conditions tagged by the US to get back GSP but the US decision forced him showing no interest in taking further initiatives. “But, I hope, the US will consider it at the upcoming Ticfa meeting.”

The Commerce Minister alleged that many countries do not want the growth of Bangladesh. “Even Pakistan, where the human rights are violated and working condition is bad has been given the GSP.”

Bangladesh’s apparels have been enjoying duty-free benefits to majority of the developed and developing countries. But Bangladesh’s apparels do not enjoy duty-free benefit only in US market.

The Commerce Minister hoped that nobody can stop the march forward of Bangladesh as the export from Bangladesh to the US and also to the EU will not be hampered due to latest move by the USTR.

In January this year’s review, the USTR recognised progress but urged that more needs to be done on worker safety and rights.

The USTR-led interagency review concluded that while Bangladesh has made progress over the last year to address fire and building safety issues in the ready-made garment (RMG) sector, further progress is needed, including to address serious worker rights issues, before the reinstatement of Bangladesh’s trade benefits under the GSP can be considered.

President Obama suspended Bangladesh from GSP in June 2013 based on Bangladesh’s failure to meet statutory eligibility requirements related to worker rights.

GSP is a trade scheme under which the US allows import of more than 5,000 goods from 122 least developed and developing countries with lower or zero-duty benefit.

Under the new law, duty reductions under the GSP program will begin 30 days after the law is enacted, which took effect on July 29, 2015.

It also extends duty reductions retroactively for any goods entered in between July 31, 2013, and the effective date.

Accordingly, filers shall be entitled to file GSP-eligible entry summaries, utilising the Special Program Indicator (SPI) “A,” “A+,” or “A*,” without the payment of duty for shipments entered or withdrawn from warehouse for consumption effective July 29, 2015.

Bangladesh experienced two industrial disasters — Tazreen Fashions fire and Rana Plaza building collapse that forced the US suspended GSP. … BBC News

Share.
Loading...

Comments are closed.