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Tag Archives: Opinion

The UK election should be about ideas, not polls

by Lea Ypi on 13th November 2019 With the UK facing one of the most important elections in decades, the focus should be on the clear programmatic differences between the main parties, rather than weekly polling outcomes. If I were to give unsolicited advice to media pundits preparing to comment on the upcoming general election it would be the following: ... Read More »

The German impasse

by Adam Tooze on 12th November 2019 Adam Tooze dissects how the macroeconomic policy discourse is disabling necessary German, and European, steps forward. The autumn of 2019 is a moment of anniversaries. The 30th anniversary of German unification has garnered much attention. Rather less remarked upon has been the ten-year anniversary of the eurozone crisis. It was in the autumn ... Read More »

Is there a place for ethics in Smart Cities?

By Dr Jaspal Kaur Sadhu Singh It is difficult to win a debate on ethics when you are pitted against a crowd of tech-acolytes. I was taking the position that a more vital consideration in developing cities are ethical ones rather than the smartness of the technology utilised in the infrastructure and running of facilities or services in cities. The ... Read More »

The Manchester revolution

by Paul Mason on 23rd October 2019 @paulmasonnews Paul Mason reimagines the Manchester of his birth in a postcapitalist age—and raises the challenge of getting there. Imagine this: a child is born in a city where 40 per cent of the workforce make things with machines and manual labour. The dominant social relationship is the wage relation. The social contract ... Read More »

It happens only in India

Sudhirendar Sharma Mention of a railway journey invites memories of the good, and not-so-good travel experiences over time. More than the destination, it is the sheer experience of being on the train journey that replays through awful encounters, amusing anecdotes, and avoidable follies. Yet, there is something compelling that continues to entice people to persist with their train journeys, quite ... Read More »

Financing the green transition

By Bertrand Badré and Antoine Sire Paris – Four years after world leaders signed the Paris climate agreement and adopted the United Nations’ 2030 Agenda with its 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), the global environmental crisis shows every sign of worsening. Polar ice and glaciers are melting at an accelerating rate. Read More »

Climate leadership from developing countries

by Lee White, Tanguy Gahouma Libreville – When Gabon ratified the 2015 Paris climate agreement, its real work was just beginning. The main challenge was to find ways to conserve the country’s natu ral environment and address the growing climate crisis, while not limiting economic opportunities for its people. Almost four years later, we have a deeper understanding of the ... Read More »

Brexit reveals Jeremy Corbyn to be the true moderate

By Jonathan Cook If there is an upside to Brexit, it is this: it has made it increasingly hard to present Jeremy Corbyn, contrary to everything the corporate media has been telling us for the past four years, as anything but a political moderate. In truth, he is one of the few moderates left in British – or maybe that ... Read More »

Rosatom Chief for maximizing nuclear technology for SDGs

Alexey Likhachev, Director General of Russia’s state nuclear energy corporation-ROSATOM emphasized on maximum harnessing the potential of nuclear technologies in order to implement the decisions of the Paris Agreement on Climate Change and achieve sustainable development goals. He was addressing the plenary session of the 63rd Annual General Conference of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) concluded in Vienna recently. ... Read More »

C’wealth model offers hope for easing multilateral trade tensions

By Patricia Scotland, Commonwealth Secretary-General 7 October 2019 – Global uncertainties and tensions are escalating and affecting trade in every region. We see rising protectionism, while multilateral cooperation – including through the World Trade Organisation – is increasingly under threat. Meanwhile, the resilience of many smaller or less developed countries is being undermined by the impact of climate change and ... Read More »

How media technocrats manipulate public opinion

By Jan Lundius Stockholm / Rome, Oct 2 2019 (IPS) – In a 1974 article, Woody Allen poked fun at biblical stories presenting ludicrous paraphrases of The Book of Job, Abraham´s intended sacrifice of his son Isaac, as well as The Book of Proverbs. One of Allen´s invented proverbs was: “The wicked at heart probably know something”, thus implementing that ... Read More »

Common ground

by Hans Dembowski In politics, there are two different ways to refer to religion. One is to pretend to be exerting God’s will; the other is to spell out the ethics of one’s faith. Read More »

What matters at the end is ingenuity

Sudhirendar Sharma Bad news holds currency, subsuming whatever little good that lies littered around. That has been the way of life, lately. Had I not read hugely popular Factfulness by noted statistician Hans Rosling who stressed that one must strive to get the good things out in the public, it wouldn’t have occurred to me to revisit the momentous weeks ... Read More »

Why radical right no longer exclusive domain of older, male voters

by Caroline Marie Lancaster on 26th September 2019 The typical radical-right voter is often assumed to be older and male, with conservative views on women’s and LGBT rights—an assumption which should now be reassessed. Today’s European radical right is rife with contradiction. Once the electoral home of working-class men, disillusioned with the decline of industry and the rapid entry of ... Read More »

Climate code red

By Rachel Kyte Washington, DC – When emergencies strike, special processes within governments and communities swing into gear. And everyone steps up to help. Read More »