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Tag Archives: Opinion

On the brink of war?

By Chandra Muzaffar Are we on the brink of a Third World War? There are signs that demand that we ask this question. Three clusters of signs compel us to probe a question that could well determine the future of our civilisation. Read More »

Be ready for a smooth ride

Sudhirendar Sharma In recent times mention of ubiquitous traffic jams often kick-start most civic conversations, and sadly end-up at just that. Lest you missed out, the inconclusive deliberations leave a trail of repetitive accusations on urban planners and traffic regulators. Crowding of roads by paddle and e-rickshaws receive abusive treatment during such civic exchanges which curiously veer towards a discussion ... Read More »

2020: a year full of danger

By Farhana Haque Rahman Rome, Jan 6 2020 (IPS) – Let’s face what lies ahead with open eyes: 2020 is going to be a very tough year for the world, and developing countries in particular. The infant decade has already begun with the harbingers of climate disaster as thousands fled to beaches in Australia from raging bush fires, and the ... Read More »

ইরাক-সিরিয়ার সাম্প্রতিক ধ্বংশযজ্ঞের দায় বৃটিশ ডীপ স্টেটের

বাংলার স্বাধীন নবাব সিরাজুদ্দৌলা, মুসলিম লীগের প্রতিষ্ঠাতা নওয়াব সলিমুল্লাহ, পাকিস্তানের প্রতিষ্ঠাতা কায়েদে আযম মোহাম্মদ আলী জিন্নাহ, পাকিস্তান আন্দোলনের প্রধাণ অর্থদাতা ইস্পাহানী ও আগা খান – এরা সবাই শিয়া ছিলেন। Read More »

US’ Latest Bombing Shows US Lost Iraq War

January 4, 2020 MISES By Ryan McMaken The US government tells us that Iraq is harbouring anti-US Iranian forces and must be bombed. Yesterday, the US bombed Baghdad International Airport, killing seven people, including an Iranian general and two Iraqi politicians. Meanwhile, US marines invaded Iraqi sovereign territory — in a move euphemistically called “arrest raids” — in an effort ... Read More »

Reflections for a New Year

By Roberto Savio Rome, Jan 3 2020 (IPS) – In a world shaken by so many problems, it is difficult to look at 2020 and not make some kind of holistic analysis. While enormous progress has been made on many fronts, it is clear that the tide has turned, and we are now entering – or have already entered – ... Read More »

A new hope for US climate action

By Jules Kortenhorst and Andrew Steer Boulder, Colorado – The United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP25) took place in Madrid was supposed to prepare the ground for more ambitious national climate commitments. Nowhere was this more important than in the country where national leadership on climate change is least likely: the United States. Read More »

Is tech a new frontier for sustainability?

By Bertrand Badré and Philippe Heim Paris – Discussions about “sustainability” usually center on a company’s environmental and social commitments, and for understandable reasons. But the financial sector in particular should consider two other, less obvious, dimensions of sustainability. Regulatory sustainability is essential for addressing the systemic risk that the financial sector poses to our societies. In addition, the emerging ... Read More »

2019 – A Devastating Year in Review

By Farhana Haque Rahman ROME, Dec 16 2019 (IPS) – By any measure, this has been a devastating year: fires across the Amazon, the Arctic and beyond; floods and drought in Africa; rising temperatures, carbon emissions and sea levels; accelerating the loss of species, and mass forced migrations of people. Read More »

2019: A Year in Review

By IPS World Desk Dec 16 2019 (IPS) – 2019 will be remembered as the year the climate crisis shook us all. Hopefully, it will also be remembered for the fightback manifested in the spread of mass protests and civic movements against governments and industries failing to respond. Read More »

A fair Brexit

by Philippe van Parijs on 16th December 2019 @pvpbrussels For the free-market Tory right, Brexit is a means towards a beggar-my-neighbour buccaneering adventure—not ‘future relations’ to which the EU27 can agree. Read More »

15 Children’s Books Celebrating the Power of Food and Agriculture

Danielle Nierenberg If you browse the food shelves at a bookstore or local library, you’ll probably find an important selection of cookbooks, memoirs, and journalistic investigations into our food system. Maybe you’ll recognize the names of the authors. One thing stands out: Many of these books are geared toward adults — and we need to include children in the conversation ... Read More »

UN to resolve the Rohingya humanitarian crisis

By Askiah Adam The Rohingya refugees have, for decades now, been fleeing their homeland, the Rakhine province in Myanmar. Mostly through Yangon’s inaction, elements of the military and members of the majority Buddhist population were left to run rampage amongst this helpless Muslim minority. Made stateless by Yangon in 1982, left totally vulnerable to the frightful violence of rape, mass ... Read More »

Reversing the Death of Venice

by Carlo Ratti VENICE – Some of the worst floodings in Venice’s history has submerged some of the historic city’s renowned cultural sites, including St. Mark’s Basilica on Piazza San Marco. This is only the sixth time the basilica has been flooded in 1,200 years, but the fourth time in the last two decades, and the second time in under ... Read More »

Natural-Born Climate Commitments

by Sally Jewell WASHINGTON, DC – When world leaders gather at the 25th United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP25) in Madrid from December 2-13, they will discuss concrete steps for meeting and increasing national emissions-reduction targets. But equally important, COP25 offers an opportunity to elevate one of the most powerful tools we have to address climate change: nature. Read More »

Why We Strike Again

by Greta Thunberg, Luisa Neubauer, Angela Valenzuela MADRID – For more than a year, children and young people from around the world have been striking for the climate. We launched a movement that defied all expectations, with millions of people lending their voices – and their bodies – to the cause. Read More »

Eminent eco-poet from Madrid Zhivka Baltadzhieva speaks

BY Poet Siti Ruqaiyah Hashim SRH: Tell me more about your childhood background, schooling and university education. Pregunta: I grew up in great solitude. My grandparents, the men, were not very talkative. They had been very leftist, very revolutionary, my grandfather had even been shot and thrown into a ravine in the year 1924 (few months before his son was ... Read More »

The Brexit Election: Not all outcomes are equally bad

by Brendan Donnelly Director, The Federal Trust 27th November 2019 – Jeremy Corbyn has rarely in recent decades feared political controversy. On issues such as Ireland, the Middle East, NATO, income redistribution and renationalisation, he has advocated with candour and persistence views that have been unattractive, even shocking to many electors. Many of his supporters thereby hail him as a ... Read More »

Five lessons for journalism in the age of rage

by Karin Pettersson on 25th November 2019 @AB_Karin For Karin Pettersson, journalism has never been more challenging—and never more important. The news-media industry has long lamented about how the digital revolution has broken its business models. Today, a majority of digital advertising money goes to Facebook and Google, and media companies are struggling to reinvent themselves through digital subscriptions. But ... Read More »

Green Steel

By Charlotte KingReprint Beijing, China, Nov 21 2019 (IPS) – How Indonesian craftsmanship is undergoing a revival at the world’s first ‘bamboo university’. Read More »

The UK election should be about ideas, not polls

by Lea Ypi on 13th November 2019 With the UK facing one of the most important elections in decades, the focus should be on the clear programmatic differences between the main parties, rather than weekly polling outcomes. If I were to give unsolicited advice to media pundits preparing to comment on the upcoming general election it would be the following: ... Read More »

The German impasse

by Adam Tooze on 12th November 2019 Adam Tooze dissects how the macroeconomic policy discourse is disabling necessary German, and European, steps forward. The autumn of 2019 is a moment of anniversaries. The 30th anniversary of German unification has garnered much attention. Rather less remarked upon has been the ten-year anniversary of the eurozone crisis. It was in the autumn ... Read More »

Is there a place for ethics in Smart Cities?

By Dr Jaspal Kaur Sadhu Singh It is difficult to win a debate on ethics when you are pitted against a crowd of tech-acolytes. I was taking the position that a more vital consideration in developing cities are ethical ones rather than the smartness of the technology utilised in the infrastructure and running of facilities or services in cities. The ... Read More »