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How Norway fuelled the electric vehicle revolution

Electric vehicles could be integral to the world improving its environmental performance. GlobalData’s power technology writer, JP Casey says: “Thanks to improvements in operational efficiency and reductions in the production of harmful pollutants compared to combustion engine-powered vehicles, hope has grown that replacing existing car models with newer, electric equivalents could lead to positive change in the world’s pollution levels. Read More »

U-19 World Cup Young Tigers put Bangladesh on top of the world

Dhaka — Junior Tigers made history beating the four-time champions India by three wickets in a dramatic final of the ICC Under-19 World Cup on Sunday at Potchefstroom, South Africa. It was Bangladesh’s first-ever final in an ICC event (outside the World Cup qualifying ICC Trophy), and they didn’t miss the chance to create history, emerging as unbeaten champions. To ... Read More »

The EU’s Risky Green Taxonomy

by Stan Dupré PARIS – European Union member states and the European Parliament are soon expected to adopt a so-called “taxonomy” for classifying green investments, after reaching an agreement last month on a list of “sustainable” economic activities. Once the new system enters into force, most likely this year, the European Commission will use this list to determine which financial ... Read More »

Trump attempting to consolidate the Balfour Declaration

By Askiah Adam There are two schools of thought as to whither the fate of the newly revealed proposed settlement to the protracted Palestine problem. One espoused by Scott Ritter, former UN Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) Inspector, that it is an offer that Palestinians cannot refuse and the other that it must be rejected, not least because of its ... Read More »

Food security and nutrition: ‘Organic is the Future’

By Sapna Gopal HIMALAYAS, India, Jan 30 2020 (IPS) – Vandana Shiva, a pioneer of organic farming in India, is incensed by the 2019 draft law to compulsorily register all seeds used by farmers. On a wintry afternoon, at her farm Navdanya in the Himalayan foothills, the noted ecologist spoke on the future of the organic farming movement in India. Read More »

Corporal punishment is not the panacea of society’s ills

To touch a petal of a beautiful rose flower may not kill it, but its God-given bloom wilters before your very eyes. Imagine what corporal punishment can do to the delicate developing mind of a child What a priceless 100th birthday gift it would be to Bangabandhu if Bangladesh had no corporal punishment and its youth were confidently marching towards ... Read More »

The fierce urgency of COP26

by Adam Tooze Adam Tooze stresses that the critical COP26 conference later this year hinges on European unity and radical leadership. There are turning points in history. Moments that matter, those mark beginnings and ends. As Martin Luther King reminded us, ‘There is such a thing as being too late.’ It is that which can give politics its fierce urgency. ... Read More »

Belt and Road Initiative: The Bridge that Spans the World

By Peter Koenig The Belt and Road Initiative (BRI), also called the New Silk Road, is based on a 2,100-year-old trade route between the Middle East and Eastern Asia, called the Silk Road. It wound its ways across the huge landmass Eurasia to the most eastern parts of China. It favoured trading, based on the Taoist philosophy of harmony and ... Read More »

Trump stands trial at the start of an election year

Washington, AP/UNB, Jan 17 – The U.S. Senate opened the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump with a quiet ceremony Thursday — senators standing at their desks to swear an oath of “impartial justice” as jurors, House prosecutors formally reciting the charges and Chief Justice John Roberts presiding. Read More »

Pope Francis: God still loves us all, even the worst of us

Pope Francis has ushered in Christmas by saying God loves everyone – “even the worst of us”. He was speaking to thousands of people during Christmas Eve Mass in St Peter’s Basilica at the Vatican. “You may have mistaken ideas, you may have made a complete mess of things… but the Lord continues to love you,” the Argentine pontiff said. Read More »

Climate policy, ‘just transition’ and quality of government

by Marina Povitikina and Bo Rothstein on 17th December 2019 In our series on ‘just transition’, Marina Povitkina and Bo Rothstein argue neglected issues around quality of government need addressing to secure public legitimacy. The challenges which climate change is heralding are nothing if not formidable. Effective policies against this threat to human wellbeing on our planet will imply huge ... Read More »

The nine-year-old Palestinian with 100 wounds

By Ramzy Baroud Kafr Qaddum is a small Palestinian village located between Nablus and Qalqilya in the northern West Bank. The inhabitants of the village feel angry and abandoned, with most of their land located under total Israeli military control. Thus, they are subjected to land theft by the ever-expanding nearby illegal Jewish colonies. Protesting the Israeli occupation and the ... Read More »

The Ignoble Fall of a Nobel Peace Prize Winner

By Thalif Deen UN, Dec 12 2019 (IPS) – Appearing before 17 judges of the International Court of Justice (ICJ) in The Hague, Aung San Suu Kyi, the de facto civilian leader of Myanmar, became a public apologist for the military government of Myanmar which has long been accused of genocide and forcing over 730,000 Rohingya Muslims to flee to ... Read More »

15 Children’s Books Celebrating the Power of Food and Agriculture

Danielle Nierenberg If you browse the food shelves at a bookstore or local library, you’ll probably find an important selection of cookbooks, memoirs, and journalistic investigations into our food system. Maybe you’ll recognize the names of the authors. One thing stands out: Many of these books are geared toward adults — and we need to include children in the conversation ... Read More »

UN to resolve the Rohingya humanitarian crisis

By Askiah Adam The Rohingya refugees have, for decades now, been fleeing their homeland, the Rakhine province in Myanmar. Mostly through Yangon’s inaction, elements of the military and members of the majority Buddhist population were left to run rampage amongst this helpless Muslim minority. Made stateless by Yangon in 1982, left totally vulnerable to the frightful violence of rape, mass ... Read More »

‘Tales of the Old Dhaka’ group painting show at AFD Tuesday

The European Union National Institutes for Culture (Alliance Française de Dhaka, British Council Bangladesh, Goethe-Institut Bangladesh), EU Delegation, Embassy of Spain, Dhaka South City Corporation, Bulbul Academy of Fine Arts, and Institute of Architects Bangladesh cordially invite you to celebrate Open Heritage Week 2019 at the opening of a group painting exhibition entitled ‘Tales of the Old Dhaka’ by Joloj ... Read More »

A girl found dead in the capital might be a rape victim

Dhaka, Dec 6 – A girl, found dead on Wednesday night in a lane on the Circular Road in Malibagh area of Dhaka might have been raped before being killed, said a forensic doctor after an autopsy on Friday. Sohel Mahmud, head of the Dhaka Medical College Forensic Medicine Department, told reporters that her hands, legs, waist and spinal cord ... Read More »

Reversing the Death of Venice

by Carlo Ratti VENICE – Some of the worst floodings in Venice’s history has submerged some of the historic city’s renowned cultural sites, including St. Mark’s Basilica on Piazza San Marco. This is only the sixth time the basilica has been flooded in 1,200 years, but the fourth time in the last two decades, and the second time in under ... Read More »

The Brexit Election: Not all outcomes are equally bad

by Brendan Donnelly Director, The Federal Trust 27th November 2019 – Jeremy Corbyn has rarely in recent decades feared political controversy. On issues such as Ireland, the Middle East, NATO, income redistribution and renationalisation, he has advocated with candour and persistence views that have been unattractive, even shocking to many electors. Many of his supporters thereby hail him as a ... Read More »

Five lessons for journalism in the age of rage

by Karin Pettersson on 25th November 2019 @AB_Karin For Karin Pettersson, journalism has never been more challenging—and never more important. The news-media industry has long lamented about how the digital revolution has broken its business models. Today, a majority of digital advertising money goes to Facebook and Google, and media companies are struggling to reinvent themselves through digital subscriptions. But ... Read More »