News update
  • BNP will make Dhaka rally a success at any cost: Fakhrul     |     
  • Action as per law if BNP holds rally in Nayapaltan: DMP Chief     |     
  • Dhaka’s air continues to be unhealthy Monday morning     |     
  • Worried Fans Keep Vigil Outside Brazil Clinic of Football Icon Pele     |     
  • 5.2 magnitude earthquake felt in Dhaka, rest of country     |     

How the far right conquered Italy

World News 2022-09-27, 11:04am

far-right-wins-italy-election-068cedba2a5cdadf19177492667b2d481664255087.jpg

Far right wins Italy election.



Rome, Sep 26 (AP/UNB) – Italy is set to be governed by the far right once again after the Brothers of Italy party won the most votes in the country's national election on Sunday. 

Keeping the movement’s most potent symbol, the tricolour flame, Giorgia Meloni has taken Brothers of Italy from a fringe far-right group to Italy’s biggest party.

A century after Benito Mussolini’s 1922 March on Rome, which brought the fascist dictator to power, Meloni is poised to lead Italy’s first far-right-led government since World War II and Italy’s first woman premier.

How did post-fascism begin in Italy?

The Italian Social Movement, or MSI, was founded in 1946 by Giorgio Almirante, a chief of staff in Mussolini’s last government. It drew fascist sympathizers and officials into its ranks following Italy’s role in the war when it was allied with the Nazis and then liberated by the Allies.

Throughout the 1950-1980s, the MSI remained a small right-wing party, polling in the single digits. But historian Paul Ginsborg has noted that its mere survival in the decades after the war “served as a constant reminder of the potent appeal that authoritarianism and nationalism could still exercise among the southern students, urban poor and lower middle classes.”

The 1990s brought about a change under Gianfranco Fini, Almirante’s protege who nevertheless projected a new moderate face of the Italian right. When Fini ran for Rome mayor in 1993, he won a surprising 46.9% of the vote — not enough to win but enough to establish him as a player. Within a year, Fini had renamed the MSI the National Alliance.

It was in those years that a young Meloni, who was raised by a single mother in a Rome working-class neighbourhood, first joined the MSI’s youth branch and then went on to lead the youth branch of Fini’s National Alliance. 

Does that mean Meloni is neo-fascist 

Fini was dogged by the movement’s neo-fascist roots and his assessment that Mussolini was the 20th century’s “greatest statesman.” He disavowed that statement, and in 2003 visited the Yad Vashem Holocaust memorial in Israel. There, he described Italy’s racial laws, which restricted Jews’ rights, as part of the “absolute evil” of the war. 

Meloni, too, had praised Mussolini in her youth but visited Yad Vashem in 2009 when she was a minister in Silvio Berlusconi’s last government. Writing in her 2021 memoir “I Am Giorgia,” she described the experience as evidence of how “a genocide happens step by step, a little at a time.” 

During the campaign, Meloni was forced to confront the issue head-on, after the Democrats warned that she represented a danger to democracy. 

“The Italian right has handed fascism over to history for decades now, unambiguously condemning the suppression of democracy and the ignominious anti-Jewish laws,” she said in a campaign video.