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A geoengineering Trojan Horse

by Silvia Ribeiro Mexico City – Although the effects of climate change are becoming increasingly apparent, the progress toward reducing greenhouse-gas emissions remains as disappointing as ever, leading some to tout new technological solutions that could supposedly save the day. Harvard University’s David Keith, for example, would have us consider geoengineering – that is, deliberate, large-scale, and highly risky interventions ... Read More »

The Case for an EU Climate and Nature Czar

by Johan Rockström, Anders Wijkman, Sandrine Dixson-Declève Potsdam – As Europe roasts through another record-hot summer, it is encouraging to see that climate change is receiving the attention it deserves from Ursula von der Leyen, the European Commission president-elect. In confronting the climate emergency, she should acknowledge that rising global temperatures are a threat not just to public health and ... Read More »

Voting for Food Tank’s SXSW Panels on Diversity, Food Policy

Danielle Nierenberg Food Tank is thrilled to announce three proposed panels for South by Southwest (SXSW) 2020 in Austin, TX! We’ve developed three ideas that will engage eaters and activists, thinkers and doers, and all sorts of movers and shakers who are working for a more environmentally, economically, and socially just food system. These panels will bring underreported issues to ... Read More »

On brutality of violence against women

By Farhana Haque Rahman and Raghav Gaiha Horrific violence against women is unabated and rising in South Asia. Rome and New Delhi, Aug 6 2019 (IPS) – On a cold night in December 2012, a ghastly crime was committed in New Delhi which stunned the world. Six men dragged helpless Nirbhaya-a 23-year-old female physiotherapy intern- to the back of the ... Read More »

Is civil society arguing itself out of political space?

By Felix Dodds New York, Jul 29 2019 (IPS) – As some of you will know I have a new book out Stakeholder Democracy: Represented Democracy in a Time of Fear. (other contributors to the book were: Jan-Gustav Strandenaes, Carolina Duque Chopitea, Minu Hemmati, Susanne Salz, Bernd Lakemeier, Laura Schmitz, and Jana Borkenhagen). Read More »

Social investment for future wellbeing: Rescue, not renewal

by Anton Hemerijck and Massimiliano Santini on 29th July 2019 The welfare state in Europe must become a social-investment state if the broken European social contract is to be renewed. The new European Commission, set to take office on November 1st, will face a daunting future. Today, many people feel that the main pillars of the social contract which kept ... Read More »

Don’t fear the scooter

by Alon Tal Tel Aviv – Electric bicycles and scooters are taking a lot of heat. Concerns about traffic fatalities, terrorized pedestrians, and urban lawlessness have led a growing chorus of politicians and media commentators to conclude that the technology should be banned outright. But these critics are missing the point. Small, portable, electric transportation options are a tremendous opportun ... Read More »

Privatisation increases corruption

By Jomo Kwame Sundaram Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, Jul 23 2019 (IPS) – International financial institutions (IFIs) have typically imposed wide-ranging policy reforms – called ‘conditionalities’ – in exchange for country governments to secure access to financial assistance. Read More »

Brexit and the left

by Neal Lawson on 23rd July 2019 The Labour Party has squandered three years in addressing the challenge posed by the Brexit referendum. The left is in a mess on Brexit—both in the UK and, despite lots of solidarity, in terms of creative thinking and practical help from the wider European left. Read More »

Regulate water filter industry to avert water crises

Sudhirendar Sharma It seems a back-of-envelope estimation that a good samaritan has tossed up on social media to shock us out of slumber. Unbelievable though it may read, Ludhiana city dwellers have been credited for wasting some 15 million litres of water daily; Amritsar and Bhatinda account for 2.5 million litres; and Patiala some 2 million litres. It may seem ... Read More »

The fork is mightier than the wall

by Danielle Nierenberg New Orleans – The word “migration” conjures images of war, natural disaster, and severe economic distress. All are important reasons why people seek refuge far from home. But the single most powerful driver of migration may well be food – or, rather, the lack of it. Read More »

No excuse for violence against children

by Zoleka Mandela, Etienne Krug, Howard Taylor Geneva – At the World Health Assembly in May, we made the case for why governments and United Nations agencies need to spend more on measures to prevent noncommunicable diseases (NCDs), injury, and violence against children. One of us – Zoleka Mandela – spoke of losing her 13-year-old daughter to a drunk driver, ... Read More »

Pesticide salad, leaded fish with plastic, chemical fruit

By Baher Kamal Madrid, Jul 10 2019 (IPS) – In case you were not aware or just do not remember: all you eat, drink, breathe, wear, take as a medicine, the cosmetics you use, the walls of your house, among others, is full of chemicals. And all is really ALL. For instance, in your bathroom, formaldehyde often sits in your ... Read More »

Let’s talk about sex – and why power matters

By Dr Natalia Kanem UN, Jul 11 2019 (IPS) – Every year on World Population Day (July 11), UNFPA receives queries from journalists about the total number of people around the world. Numbers are indeed important because they help governments develop policies that respond to evolving needs for services such as education and health. Read More »

Venezuela – A risk to Dollar hegemony

By Peter Koenig After the new coup attempt – or propaganda coup – Venezuela lives in a state of foreign imposed insecurity. The failed coup was executed on 30 April by Juan Guaidó, the self-proclaimed and Washington-trained and endorsed “interim President”, and the opposition leader, Leopoldo López, who was hurriedly freed from house arrest by Guaidó with a couple of ... Read More »

Time for postcapitalism

by Paul Mason Paul Mason continues his sketch of a postcapitalist world by drawing out its implications for something in increasingly short supply—time. If we are lucky, the world stands on the brink of a rapid transition beyond carbon. We know how the post-carbon transition will be measured: the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and other bodies have created fairly ... Read More »

Europe must answer the climate call

By Christiana Figueres Brussels – In early 2015, the European Union became the first major economy to set a post-2020 target for limiting greenhouse-gas (GHG) emissions. By committing to reducing emissions to at least 40% below 1990 levels by 2030, the EU initiated a global movement that culminated in the adoption of the Paris climate agreement later that year. This ... Read More »

The world is running out of time

By Bertrand Badré Washington, DC – In 2015, the international community launched a renewed effort to tackle collective global challenges under the auspices of the United Nations Sustainable Development Agenda and the Framework Convention on Climate Change (COP21). But after an initial flurry of interest, the progress that has been made toward achieving the Sustainable Development Goals and tackling climate ... Read More »

America’s bipartisan climate-policy failure

By Mark Paul and Connor Rupp Sarasota – US President Donald Trump’s anti-climate agenda is in full swing. His administration has already taken action 117 times to repeal or weaken climate regulations, and much more deregulation is in the works. By unraveling environmental protections on an unprecedented scale, including through executive orders, Trump is using every tool at his disposal ... Read More »

Getting to net-zero emissions

By Johan Rockström Potsdam –The leaders of the G20 countries head to Osaka this week for their annual summit. United Nations Secretary-General António Guterres will address them before traveling to Abu Dhabi to finalize the arrangements for September’s UN Climate Action Summit. These meetings should set the world on course for the fastest economic transition in history. Yet both are ... Read More »

We can’t stop climate disaster if big emitters don’t step up

By Frank Bainimarama SUVA, Fiji, Jun 27, 2019 (IPS) — Are the most climate-vulnerable nations of the world right to demand that developed and major economies commit to carbon neutrality by 2050? Should the poorest nations of the world insist that the “haves” put their significant economic and political resources behind aggressive efforts to combat climate change? Do we have ... Read More »