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Emerging out of self-infliction

Sudhirendar Sharma What women need to understand is that they too have the power to make a difference. Ancient myths and legends relegate women as proverbial sacrificial lambs in the gendered narrative of our history. Yashodhara is one such, who was made to suffer protracted isolation as her husband abandoned her in his spiritual journey to attain enlightenment as the ... Read More »

Reversing the Death of Venice

by Carlo Ratti VENICE – Some of the worst floodings in Venice’s history has submerged some of the historic city’s renowned cultural sites, including St. Mark’s Basilica on Piazza San Marco. This is only the sixth time the basilica has been flooded in 1,200 years, but the fourth time in the last two decades, and the second time in under ... Read More »

Natural-Born Climate Commitments

by Sally Jewell WASHINGTON, DC – When world leaders gather at the 25th United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP25) in Madrid from December 2-13, they will discuss concrete steps for meeting and increasing national emissions-reduction targets. But equally important, COP25 offers an opportunity to elevate one of the most powerful tools we have to address climate change: nature. Read More »

Why We Strike Again

by Greta Thunberg, Luisa Neubauer, Angela Valenzuela MADRID – For more than a year, children and young people from around the world have been striking for the climate. We launched a movement that defied all expectations, with millions of people lending their voices – and their bodies – to the cause. Read More »

Corporal punishment is an ugly stain on the Bangladesh landscape

Since when does adding 2 and 2 together, or subtracting 5 from 10 ¬– and getting the answers wrong – become a punishable crime? Or for not remembering Bangabandhu facts or the lines of a Rabindranath Tagore poem? All are trivial and insignificant in the grand scheme of things and certainly does not warrant being beaten, damaged physically, mentally (or ... Read More »

The Brexit Election: Not all outcomes are equally bad

by Brendan Donnelly Director, The Federal Trust 27th November 2019 – Jeremy Corbyn has rarely in recent decades feared political controversy. On issues such as Ireland, the Middle East, NATO, income redistribution and renationalisation, he has advocated with candour and persistence views that have been unattractive, even shocking to many electors. Many of his supporters thereby hail him as a ... Read More »

Five lessons for journalism in the age of rage

by Karin Pettersson on 25th November 2019 @AB_Karin For Karin Pettersson, journalism has never been more challenging—and never more important. The news-media industry has long lamented about how the digital revolution has broken its business models. Today, a majority of digital advertising money goes to Facebook and Google, and media companies are struggling to reinvent themselves through digital subscriptions. But ... Read More »

The UK election should be about ideas, not polls

by Lea Ypi on 13th November 2019 With the UK facing one of the most important elections in decades, the focus should be on the clear programmatic differences between the main parties, rather than weekly polling outcomes. If I were to give unsolicited advice to media pundits preparing to comment on the upcoming general election it would be the following: ... Read More »

The German impasse

by Adam Tooze on 12th November 2019 Adam Tooze dissects how the macroeconomic policy discourse is disabling necessary German, and European, steps forward. The autumn of 2019 is a moment of anniversaries. The 30th anniversary of German unification has garnered much attention. Rather less remarked upon has been the ten-year anniversary of the eurozone crisis. It was in the autumn ... Read More »

Europe: Tear down those walls!

by David Gow on 9th November 2019 @gowdav It may be three decades since the Berlin wall came down but too many others have recently proliferated. ‘Die Mauer in den Köpfen’ (the wall in the heads) is a phrase I first heard as a German correspondent in the 1990s, not that long after the October 1990 celebrations of reunification at ... Read More »

Beyond headlines: The dev story behind irregular migration

By Achim Steiner UN, Oct 28 2019 (IPS) – Last week, a too-familiar human tragedy captured news headlines. 39 people were found dead inside a shipping container on an industrial estate in Essex in Southeast England; 31 men and 8 women whose individual identities, for now, remain anonymous, as authorities begin to investigate one of Europe’s worst people-trafficking cases. Read More »

Oceans as an investment priority

By Emma Navarro Oslo – The Earth’s oceans face many threats, none of which have quick fixes. Still, the solutions are known, and with a sufficiently broad coalition of partners, we can get the ball rolling on a number of fronts. Read More »

The Manchester revolution

by Paul Mason on 23rd October 2019 @paulmasonnews Paul Mason reimagines the Manchester of his birth in a postcapitalist age—and raises the challenge of getting there. Imagine this: a child is born in a city where 40 per cent of the workforce make things with machines and manual labour. The dominant social relationship is the wage relation. The social contract ... Read More »

It happens only in India

Sudhirendar Sharma Mention of a railway journey invites memories of the good, and not-so-good travel experiences over time. More than the destination, it is the sheer experience of being on the train journey that replays through awful encounters, amusing anecdotes, and avoidable follies. Yet, there is something compelling that continues to entice people to persist with their train journeys, quite ... Read More »

Financing the green transition

By Bertrand Badré and Antoine Sire Paris – Four years after world leaders signed the Paris climate agreement and adopted the United Nations’ 2030 Agenda with its 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), the global environmental crisis shows every sign of worsening. Polar ice and glaciers are melting at an accelerating rate. Read More »

Climate leadership from developing countries

by Lee White, Tanguy Gahouma Libreville – When Gabon ratified the 2015 Paris climate agreement, its real work was just beginning. The main challenge was to find ways to conserve the country’s natu ral environment and address the growing climate crisis, while not limiting economic opportunities for its people. Almost four years later, we have a deeper understanding of the ... Read More »

The world mustn’t sleep-walk into another debt crisis

By Patricia Scotland, Commonwealth Secretary-General 16 October 2019 -Trade wars, protectionism, and nationalist rhetoric are combining to create the possibility of a nightmare debt crisis that could be worse than any previously experienced. Global borrowing is now at the highest levels since the 1950s – and history suggests we should take this as a warning that a debt crisis could ... Read More »